Работает база данных...



    • Main Page
    • SOURCES: Papers on Y сhromosomal variation

    Boundaries and clines in the West Eurasian Y-chromosome landscape: insights from the European part of Russia


    У вас нет прав на скачивание файла
    Login:
    Password:
    Register
    Forgot your password?

    Reference Type: Journal Article

    Record Number: 32

    Author: A. Fechner, D. Quinque, S. Rychkov, I. Morozowa, O. Naumova, Y. Schneider, S. Willuweit, O. Zhukova, L. Roewer, M. Stoneking and I. Nasidze

    Year: 2008

    Title: Boundaries and clines in the West Eurasian Y-chromosome landscape: insights from the European part of Russia

    Journal: Am J Phys Anthropol

    Volume: 137

    Issue: 1

    Pages: 41-7

    Epub Date: 2008/05/13

    Date: Sep

    Short Title: Boundaries and clines in the West Eurasian Y-chromosome landscape: insights from the European part of Russia

    ISSN: 1096-8644 (Electronic)

    DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.20838,

    Accession Number: 18470899

    Keywords: Chromosomes, Human, Y/*genetics, European Continental Ancestry Group/*genetics, Genetic Heterogeneity, *Genetic Variation, *Genetics, Population, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Russia,

    Abstract: Previous studies of Y chromosome variation have revealed that western Europe, the Volga-Ural region, and the Caucasus differ dramatically with respect to Y-SNP haplogroup composition. The European part of Russia is situated in between these three regions; to determine if these differences reflect clines or boundaries in the Y-chromosome landscape, we analyzed 12 Y-SNPs in 545 males from 12 populations from the European part of Russia. The majority of Russian Y chromosomes (from 74% to 94%) belong to three Y chromosomal lineages [I-M170, R1a1-M17, and N3-TAT] that are also frequent in the rest of east Europe, north Europe, and/or in the Volga-Ural region. We find significant but low correlations between haplogroup frequencies and the geographic location of populations, suggesting gradual change in the Y chromosome gene pool across western Eurasia. However, we also find some significant boundaries between populations, suggesting that both isolation and migration have influenced the Y chromosome landscape.

    Notes: Fechner, Angela, Quinque, Dominique, Rychkov, Sergey, Morozowa, Irina, Naumova, Oksana, Schneider, Yuriy, Willuweit, Sascha, Zhukova, Olga, Roewer, Lutz, Stoneking, Mark, Nasidze, Ivan, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, United States, American journal of physical anthropology, Am J Phys Anthropol. 2008 Sep;137(1):41-7.,

    Author Address: Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.

    Language: eng