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    Dissecting the genetic history of Sao Tome e Principe: a new window from Y-chromosome biallelic markers


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    Reference Type: Journal Article

    Record Number: 148

    Author: M. J. Trovoada, L. Tavares, L. Gusmao, C. Alves, A. Abade, A. Amorim and M. J. Prata

    Year: 2007

    Title: Dissecting the genetic history of Sao Tome e Principe: a new window from Y-chromosome biallelic markers

    Journal: Ann Hum Genet

    Volume: 71

    Issue: Pt 1

    Pages: 77-85

    Epub Date: 2007/01/18

    Date: Jan

    Short Title: Dissecting the genetic history of Sao Tome e Principe: a new window from Y-chromosome biallelic markers

    ISSN: 0003-4800 (Print)

    DOI: AHG309 [pii], 10.1111/j.1469-1809.2006.00309.x,

    Accession Number: 17227478

    Keywords: Africa, African Continental Ancestry Group/*genetics, Alleles, Chromosomes, Human, Y/*genetics, Emigration and Immigration, Ethnic Groups/*genetics, Genetic Drift, Genetic Markers, *Genetics, Population, Geography, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Phylogeny,

    Abstract: Twenty biallelic Y chromosome markers were analyzed in Angolares, Forros and Tongas, three population groups from the African archipelago of Sao Tome e Principe. While most male lineages belonged to sub-Saharan haplogroups, the component of European origin added up 23.9% in the archipelago. This contrasts with the reported absence of European mtDNA lineages, and the combined findings testify to a strong sex-biased admixture process during the long-lasting colonial period in Sao Tome e Principe. Furthermore, the male mediated European component was clearly found to be out of proportion to the small demographic impact of the Portuguese on the islands, reflecting high variance in the reproductive success of the individuals that contributed to its peopling. The male portion of European ancestry was 33.3% in Forros, 27.3% in Tongas and approximately two-fold less, 14.5%, in Angolares. The Angolares also showed the lowest haplogroup diversity and the most reduced number of different haplogroups. The current results reinforce our previous evidence pointing to remarkable restrictions in gene flow between Angolares and other Sao Tomean inhabitants, in agreement with their considerable isolation and confinement to the south-eastern tip of Sao Tome until recently.

    Notes: Trovoada, M J, Tavares, L, Gusmao, L, Alves, C, Abade, A, Amorim, A, Prata, M J, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, England, Annals of human genetics, Ann Hum Genet. 2007 Jan;71(Pt 1):77-85.,

    Author Address: Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Rua da Quinta Grande, 6, P-2780-156 Oeiras, Portugal.

    Language: eng