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    Geographical, linguistic, and cultural influences on genetic diversity: Y-chromosomal distribution in Northern European populations


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    Reference Type: Journal Article

    Record Number: 161

    Author: T. Zerjal, L. Beckman, G. Beckman, A. V. Mikelsaar, A. Krumina, V. Kucinskas, M. E. Hurles and C. Tyler-Smith

    Year: 2001

    Title: Geographical, linguistic, and cultural influences on genetic diversity: Y-chromosomal distribution in Northern European populations

    Journal: Mol Biol Evol

    Volume: 18

    Issue: 6

    Pages: 1077-87

    Epub Date: 2001/05/24

    Date: Jun

    Short Title: Geographical, linguistic, and cultural influences on genetic diversity: Y-chromosomal distribution in Northern European populations

    ISSN: 0737-4038 (Print)

    Accession Number: 11371596

    Keywords: Analysis of Variance, Culture, Europe, Genetic Markers/genetics, *Genetic Variation, Genetics, Population, Geography, Haplotypes, Humans, Linguistics, Male, Microsatellite Repeats/genetics, Polymorphism, Genetic, Y Chromosome/*genetics,

    Abstract: We analyzed 10 Y-chromosomal binary markers in 363 males from 8 populations in Northern Europe and 5 Y microsatellites in 346 of these individuals. These populations can be grouped according to cultural, linguistic, or geographical criteria, and the groupings are different in each case. We can therefore ask which criterion best corresponds to the distribution of genetic variation. In an AMOVA analysis using the binary markers, 13% of the Y variation was found between populations, indicating a high level of differentiation within this small area. No significant difference was seen between the traditionally nomadic Saami and the neighboring, historically farming, populations. When the populations were divided into Uralic speakers and Indo-European speakers, 8% of the variation was found between groups, but when they were divided according to geographical location, 14% of the variation was between groups. Geographical factors have thus been the most important in limiting gene flow between these populations, but linguistic differences have also been important in the east.

    Notes: Zerjal, T, Beckman, L, Beckman, G, Mikelsaar, A V, Krumina, A, Kucinskas, V, Hurles, M E, Tyler-Smith, C, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, United States, Molecular biology and evolution, Mol Biol Evol. 2001 Jun;18(6):1077-87.,

    Author Address: Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, England.

    Language: eng